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Museums and Libraries

From Driehaus to Our House

A Chicago donor reintroduces timeless principles of proportion, harmony, and visual delight into America’s public spaces.

By James Panero

From Philanthropy magazine, Fall 2012

The elegant classicism of the National Mall has long been a proper tribute to the great heroes of the republic. But a proliferation of new monuments has disrupted the Mall’s architectural harmony. When the proposed Dwight Eisenhower Memorial threatened to add yet more postmodern sprawl, Richard Driehaus pushed back. Click here to read a profile by the New Criterion’s James Panero.

Bible Museum Coming to Nation’s Capital

The Green family selects Washington, D.C., as the location for their world-class museum of the Bible

The Green family has selected Washington, D.C., as the location for their world-class museum of the Bible. Last summer, managing editor Evan Sparks explored the Green family’s collection of biblical artifacts and reported on their plans for a unique museum dedicated to the Bible. Read more about the Greens’ philanthropy and their plans for a new museum in Washington.

Illuminated Giving

Meet the family that is building a world-class museum dedicated to the Bible.

By Evan Sparks

From Philanthropy magazine, Summer 2011

You could travel the world in search of the rarest biblical artifacts and manuscripts—or, more simply, you could visit Oklahoma City. There Hobby Lobby founder David Green and his family have assembled an unrivaled collection of biblical artifacts and scriptural antiquities. Thanks to the Green family, the city will soon be home to a world-class museum of the Bible—the first of its kind in the country.

Oil on Canvas

The Rockefeller family has long been among the nations most generous patrons of high culture. Suzanne Loebl assesses its legacy.

By James Panero

From Philanthropy magazine, Winter 2011

The Rockefeller family has long been among the nation’s most generous patrons of high culture. James Panero assesses the family’s contributions to the Museum of Modern Art, New York’s Riverside Church, Colonial Williamsburg, Rockefeller Center, the Cloisters, Lincoln Center, the Asia Society, and much else besides, in his review of Suzanne Loebl’s America’s Medicis.

The Carnegie Corporation Turns 100

A century has passed since Carnegie founded the Carnegie Corporation of New York. What would its founder think of it today?

By Leslie Lenkowsky

From Philanthropy magazine, Winter 2011

What would Andrew Carnegie think of his corporation today? As the Carnegie Corporation of New York marks a century of giving, Leslie Lenkowsky looks at their past and present, examining their commitment to their donor’s intent. Would the man who set forth the principles of scientific philanthropy in “The Gospel of Wealth” find the Carnegie Corporation faithful to his vision?

Outsmarting Albert Barnes

The Barnes Collection has opened in its new home in Philadelphia, yet its saga leaves a cautionary tale behind in Merion

By James Panero

From Philanthropy magazine, Summer 2011

After years of controversy, the saga of the Barnes Foundation came to an end, and the collection has now opened in its new home in Philadelphia. James Panero looks at the cautionary tale left behind in Merion. Read his piece from the Summer 2011 issue of Philanthropy and see how Albert Barnes, in going to extravagant lengths to preserve his vision in perpetuity, managed to outsmart everyone—including himself.

Pixel Perfect

Google is assembling ultra-high-resolution images of the world's greatest art.

By Eleanor Barkhorn

From Philanthropy magazine, Summer 2011

Touring the world’s art galleries is now as simple as opening your web browser. Through the Google Art Project, Google is putting a new twist on corporate philanthropy: devoting its business resources to making some of the world’s greatest art available online, in high resolution, at no charge.

Wal-Art

Alice Walton is preparing to open the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas.

By Kelly Jane Torrance

From Philanthropy magazine, Summer 2011

The arts can transform a region. Just ask the citizens of Bentonville, Arkansas, where Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton’s daughter Alice is opening the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.