Current Department: Books
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  • Males Beyond the Pale

    January 2017

    David Bass

    An invisible army of able-bodied men are not working, and getting away with it.

  • Minor Characters

    October 2016

    Monica Klem

    The NEA and NEH have minimal roles  in U.S. arts and letters. 

  • Improving Political Diversity on Campus

    October 2016

    Jacqueline Pfeffer Merrill

    Can philanthropy help mend our one-party universities?

  • The Quiet Man Behind the Computer Revolution

    July 2016

    Adam Keiper

    Gordon Moore’s tech vision changed modern times. He wants his giving to change life 10,000 years from now.

  • No Such Thing as a Free Gift

    July 2016

    Karen Hyman

    Is the Gates footprint too big?

  • A Watchdog with Only One Eye

    July 2016

    Scott Walter

    "The history she describes is not hidden, and the people she writes about are not radicals.” A review of author Jane Mayer’s book Dark Money: This very selective “exposé” distorts reality.

  • Are College Sports Out of Control?

    April 2016

    Leslie Lenkowsky

    Gilbert Gaul argues in his new book, Billion-Dollar Ball, that athletic programs at a number of major universities have become so lucrative that it should be questioned whether they deserve to be considered part of higher education and entitled to various benefits.

  • Redefining Usury

    April 2016

    John Steele Gordon

    How a self-interested banker helped millions of people prosper. In this book review we learn about Jacob Fugger, who lived from 1459 to 1525, and the ways he powerfully nudged the modern world into existence.

  • Peggy Guggenheim: The Shock of the Modern

    April 2016

    Jen Para

    The poor Guggenheim. 

  • Shakespeare’s Savior

    January 2016

    Algis Valiunas

    Henry Folger made it his life’s work to gather up scattered British treasure and bring it to America for conservation. 

  • Books in Brief

    January 2016

    Pat Burke

    In her well-timed work The Prize, which takes an in-depth look at the battles in Newark over Mark Zuckerberg’s gift, veteran journalist Dale Russakoff offers her analysis. 

  • Books in Brief

    October 2015

    Scott Walter

    Do you think the suffering of human beings is more important than the suffering of other animals? Do you think it’s valuable to know the people who run a charity you support? In his new book, controversial bioethics professor Peter Singer argues that these views and behaviors are mistaken.

  • Where Boys Flounder

    October 2015

    Dan Fishman, Matt Bazik

    Today's schools are inhospitable to many young males. Two books show us that this educational decay will mean worse things to come if we don’t restore excellence in the schooling of both sexes.

  • Reinvented in California

    October 2015

    Chris Weinkopf

    Howard Ahmanson's golden touch. 

  • Books in Brief

    October 2015

    Reviews on two recent reads about school reform and data-driven philanthropy: Reign of Error and The Robin Hood Rules for Smart Giving. 

  • The Other One Percent

    July 2015

    Andrea Scott

    In For Love of Country: What Our Veterans Can Teach Us About Citizenship, Heroism, and Sacrifice, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz and Washington Post associate editor Rajiv Chandrasekaran argue that it is imperative for U.S. citizens to become more engaged with our troops.

  • Something Out of Nothing

    July 2015

    John Steele Gordon

    It is said that necessity is the mother of invention. And invention is the father of philanthropy, because it creates the wealth that enables great generosity. Now a dazzling new book uncovers philanthropy’s grandparentage.

  • Embarrassment of Riches?

    July 2015

    John Steele Gordon

    Robert Dalzell's new book on the "problem of vast individual fortunes" is a little threadbare, argues John Steele Gordon.

  • When Charities Behave Badly

    July 2015

    Suzanne Garment and Leslie Lenkowsky

    Reviewing Ken Stern's harsh critique of American charities, Leslie Lenkowsky and Suzanne Garment defend diversity and freedom in philanthropy.